Personal Reflection: The Thin Line Between Cultural Appropriation and Critical Engagement

As a white, privileged, and educated woman, I have tried to reflect on my privilege when embarking on projects which showcase the narratives of others–especially if those narratives involve oppression or violence that I have not experience due to my privilege. During my time at COP23, I was very thoughtful about my role of the … Continue reading Personal Reflection: The Thin Line Between Cultural Appropriation and Critical Engagement

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Too much English!

You’ve probably read about it in the news. It’s a sweeping sensation around the world. It’s showing up in classrooms and science publications, even on street signs and in restaurants. It may be the solution to international cooperation. If you haven’t heard, it’s a pretty big deal. Is it a bird? A plane? No, its … Continue reading Too much English!

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To Cool & To Fight: Mitigation and Resilience Building in the Dominican Republic

If you’ve been following along, you can see the Caribbean has a very special place in my heart. Both sides of my family are from the island of Cuba, and the surrounding archipelago has similar cultural – and environmental – ties to each other. My larger research focuses on deforestation in Haiti and the Dominican … Continue reading To Cool & To Fight: Mitigation and Resilience Building in the Dominican Republic

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Political Mobilization & Agroecology: Jesús Vazquez and La Vía Campesina

While at the negotiation, I was able to attend a number of side events that brought together researchers, activists, and delegates to discuss actions and reactions to issues within the COP. One of my suggestions within my white paper was on agroforestry and agroecology, as a form of both mitigation and adaptation to climate change. … Continue reading Political Mobilization & Agroecology: Jesús Vazquez and La Vía Campesina

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Adaptations to Empower Nepali Farmers

If you want to see climate change from the front lines, step into the shoes of a farmer from the mountains of Nepal. If my earlier blogs about climate change’s effect on smallholders and ways they can adapt left you feeling that the problem is all but solved, remember that there are still hundreds of […]

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